Thursday, March 4, 2021

Improve Access to Content with YouTube Subtitles

 

More than ever before, distance learning and the pandemic has made the idea of asynchronous learning en vogue. A common practice these days is to record lesson videos and post them on YouTube. For many learners, accessing asynchronous lesson videos can be a struggle. Sometimes it's the small, simple things that can make a huge difference. A simple way to increase access is to show students how to turn on subtitles on YouTube videos.

Start by clicking the settings gear button on the bottom right of a YouTube video. A menu will pop up. In this menu, you will see an option to turn on Subtitles and Closed Captions.

If subtitles are turned off, you can select a language from the menu. English learners can select their language of choice. Struggling readers can get extra practice reading with English subtitles on the screen while a concept is explained on the video.

If the options button is clicked above, you can augment the look, feel and style of the subtitles.

Below is what it looks like if you turned on the subtitles and translated them into Spanish.


If you have any questions and would like a follow up, contact me via Gmail or Chat at ajuarez@techcoachjuarez.com. 

My book, The Complete EdTech Coach: An Organic Approach to Digital Learning, co-authored with my wife Katherine Goyette is now available on Amazon. Click here to purchase. It is published by Dave Burgess Publishing. Be sure to follow the hashtag #OrganicEdTech and #CVTechTalk for updates.










Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Use Google Tasks to Help with IEP Accommodations



Not too long ago, I wrote a blog post about how to organize your IEP accommodations documents for easy access. Organizing your IEP documents is one thing, but with our hectic schedules, remembering to consider many of the nuances and unique accommodations in lesson design is another thing. 

With my hectic schedule, Google Tasks makes remembering these things much easier. Tasks helps me schedule reminders for common, frequent accommodations such as sending extra reminder emails, creating reduced alternate assignments, providing extra time for assignments, contacting case managers, and much more. 

If you're not careful, your Google Tasks list can get long and convoluted. What I like to do is create a new, secondary list for IEP accommodations. Start by opening Google Tasks on the side panel in Gmail. Click "Your Name's list" and select Create new list in the menu that appears.


Title your list.



Add your task(s) and set time/date reminders. On the days I know I will be lesson planning, I always set reminders for IEP accommodations.




Some reminders are set for certain days and others are each day during the week. 

If you don't want to have to always toggle between lists on Google Tasks, turn on Tasks in Calendar and your tasks will appear in your Calendar. I like to use the Schedule view. 


During the pandemic and in distance learning, accommodating students on IEPs is much more difficult. Anything we can do to streamline this process is definitely welcomed. How will you use Google Tasks to enhance your ability to accommodate students on IEPs. If you have any questions and would like a follow up, contact me via Gmail or Chat at ajuarez@techcoachjuarez.com. 


My book, The Complete EdTech Coach: An Organic Approach to Digital Learning, co-authored with my wife Katherine Goyette is now available on Amazon. Click here to purchase. It is published by Dave Burgess Publishing. Be sure to follow the hashtag #OrganicEdTech and #CVTechTalk for updates.





 

Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Memes in the Classroom? Check out this example!

Back on February 12, 2021, I wrote a blog post about how have students create memes for concepts learned in class using Google Slides and Google Classroom. Memes can be a great activity for identifying or connecting underlying themes as well as making content to pop culture connections.

In a lesson I recently taught about Manifest Destiny, my students, most of which are English learners, came up with some brilliant memes. I curated their memes on my Cardinal Innovation Center website. As more memes get added to the website, I am able to use them for spiral review and preview in future classes.  Click the bold titles below to see more examples of student generated memes.

Manifest Destiny

In this lesson, students learned how the United States believed it was their destiny to rule land from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans and how they made this dream come true.




In this lesson, students learned the basic causes of the Mexican American War and the role the War played in achieving Manifest Destiny.




In this lesson, students learned the purpose of the Spanish American War, its role in American Imperialism, and the spoils the US gained as a result.




In this lesson, students learned about Mark Twain's criticism of American Imperialism.


If you curate memes on a Google Site, students can use the memes as method of review, writing prompt, fodder for academic conversations, peer feedback, metacognition and more. How will you use memes in your grade level and or content area? If you have any questions and would like a follow up, contact me via Gmail or Chat at ajuarez@techcoachjuarez.com. 

My book, The Complete EdTech Coach: An Organic Approach to Digital Learning, co-authored with my wife Katherine Goyette is now available on Amazon. Click here to purchase. It is published by Dave Burgess Publishing. Be sure to follow the hashtag #OrganicEdTech and #CVTechTalk for updates.












Thursday, February 25, 2021

Get Started Using Wakelet with Students

 

Curation of learning resources is a great way to differentiate and honor varied learning styles. Wakelet is a great tool for curation. It allows you to share one link to a variety of resources to files, web links, YouTube videos, PDF files, Google Drive files and more. Below is a sample of a Wakelet collection of various resources for a COVID-19 research activity.

Get started by creating an account at wakelet.com. Once created, you'll be taken to your collections page. Click the plus button to Create a new collection.

Give your new collection a title. You have the options to add a cover image and write a description of the collection. Click the plus button to begin adding resources.

The first option is to add a web link or URL. The buttons to the right give you the options to add text, pictures, bookmarks, PDF files and social media posts.

The bookmarks option allows you to search for and add resources you've saved in Wakelet in other collections. The PDF option will open your computer's files and allow you to upload PDFs saved on your computer.

The text option allows you to simply type instructions or any message you'd like to share with students. This option gives you some basic style functions similar to those seen in Google Docs or Microsoft Word.


Clicking the social media option displays a drop down menu giving you the choice to add resources from Twitter, Flipgrid, YouTube, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive. For example, if doing a research activity on a subject like COVID-19, there are countless viewpoints and sources of information available on Twitter and YouTube. The Discovery tab in Flipgrid is another great resource for a myriad of topics.


When you click the image option, you can choose to upload an image from your computer or from your library. This library is a series of images curated by Unsplash. You can search this library for many topics. 


When adding to or editing a collection, you have the option to change viewing permissions. All Wakelet collections are Private by default. This means you are the only one who can view it. Unlisted, like with Google Drive, means only people you send the link to can view it. Public means anyone with a Wakelet account can search for and find it in Wakelet.


Another option you have when adding to or editing a collection is to change the collection's layout. My favorite is the Grid View.


Sharing your Wakelet collection is easily done. When you open a collection, you'll see a share button at the top, to the left of the edit button.


There are many ways for which to share a collection. You can share right to Google Classroom or Microsoft Teams in addition to social media, Remind or via QR code. You can also copy the link and paste it wherever you need.



This blog post is merely an introduction to Wakelet and is designed to get you started. There are many more features to this curation tool. I encourage you to get started and experiment with it. How will you use Wakelet to curate resources for students and colleagues? If you have any questions and would like a follow up, contact me via Gmail or Chat at ajuarez@techcoachjuarez.com. 

My book, The Complete EdTech Coach: An Organic Approach to Digital Learning, co-authored with my wife Katherine Goyette is now available on Amazon. Click here to purchase. It is published by Dave Burgess Publishing. Be sure to follow the hashtag #OrganicEdTech and #CVTechTalk for updates.




























Wednesday, February 24, 2021

New Lists in Google Tasks

 

On November 4, 2020, I wrote a blog post about how to utilize Google Tasks to schedule reminders for the tasks you do daily, weekly or monthly. If you're anything like me, this task list can get long. One way to organize your tasks and differentiate between tasks for lesson planning, grading, coaching and or other administrative things is to use the Create a new list function. 

The Create a new list function is a feature that is hiding in plain sight. I use it to categorize my tasks. I have a list for tech coaching, grading and lesson planning. Access this function by clicking on "Your Name's" list in Google Tasks on the right side panel within Gmail.


In the dropdown menu that appears, click Create new list.

 Give it a title and click Done.


Immediately, Google Tasks will switch over to the new list. Just like normal, click Add a task to start your new list.


Editing tasks and adding date/time is the same.


When editing a task, you can move a task from one list to another as needed.


To toggle between lists, click the Name of the list at the top of Tasks. You will then see a list of all the lists you've created. A checkmark will be next to the list that is currently open.



When viewing your list of lists, hover over one and click/drag the dots to rearrange them.


Next to Add a task, click the three dots to access more options in Google Tasks. If you need to rename a list, you will find the option here.


Google Tasks has been a game changer for my workflow during the pandemic. Using the Create a new list function has taken it to a new level. What new lists will you create? If you have any questions and would like a follow up, contact me via Gmail or Chat at ajuarez@techcoachjuarez.com. 

My book, The Complete EdTech Coach: An Organic Approach to Digital Learning, co-authored with my wife Katherine Goyette is now available on Amazon. Click here to purchase. It is published by Dave Burgess Publishing. Be sure to follow the hashtag #OrganicEdTech and #CVTechTalk for updates.












Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Immersive Reader, PDFs, Google Drive, Kami and Translation of Text

 

On February 5th, I wrote a blog post about how to use Microsoft's Immersive Reader to translate text for English learners and how you can record the "read aloud" as a video for kids as a scaffold. If you are having students read text online via Google Chrome, this works great, but what if you have text saved as a PDF in your Google Drive? In that situation, you cannot select text on a PDF when viewing via Google Drive.

To use Immersive Reader to translate and read aloud PDF text in Google Drive, you will need to open the PDF first in Kami.


With your PDF file open, hover over the text to make the Open with button appear. Click it and select Annotate with Kami in the dropdown menu.


When the PDF processes and opens in Kami, you will have two options. If, on the top right, you see an option to Run OCR, click it. Running OCR will allow you to select text on the PDF like you do when reading text on a website or on Google Docs. 


If the Run OCR button didn't appear automatically when the PDF opens in Kami, click the "hamburger menu" (three stacked lines) in the top right corner. In the dropdown menu, select OCR For Scanned PDFs. 


When OCR is finished running, you will be able to use your cursor to select text. With the text selected, right click anywhere in the selected text. In the menu that appears, click Help me read this. This will open Immersive Reader.


As explained in my blogpost from February 5th, Immersive Reader will appear and there will be a Play button that will read the selected text aloud.


If you want a translated read aloud, click the "open book" button in the top right corner. In the menu that appears, select your desired language. Turn on the switch for Document.


Immersive Reader is such a great tool for English learners. One way I've used it is to record the read aloud in another language  so they can read and hear the content in that language and use that to respond to and mark text in English. How might you use Immersive Reader to support English learners? 

If you have any questions and would like a follow up, contact me via Gmail or Chat at ajuarez@techcoachjuarez.com. My book, The Complete EdTech Coach: An Organic Approach to Digital Learning, co-authored with my wife Katherine Goyette is now available on Amazon. Click here to purchase. It is published by Dave Burgess Publishing. Be sure to follow the hashtag #OrganicEdTech and #CVTechTalk for updates.